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How to Crash PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jimmy Schrage   
Thursday, 10 September 2009 15:41

How to Crash

 

Well, I am going to try and breach the topic that many shy away from.  Crashing.  Yes, it happens.  Yes, it will happen to you.  As this is a racing site, I will focus on crashing on the track and save the other scenarios for a later date.

You know it will happen.  You know it is going to happen.  That voice in the back of your head constantly reminds you of it.  No matter how “safe” you ride, how fast you are, or how much experience you have; you will crash.  In fact, many consider this a rite-of-passage into lower lap-times.  After all, how are you supposed to test your limits unless you know them?  How are you supposed to come near your maximum abilities if you never pass them?  Some say this is a catapult into better riding.  Ironic, isn’t it? So, when you do crash, just remember that it is not the end of the world.  Sure you will have some stuff to fix, but it does not mean you are a “bad” rider.  It does not mean that it is time to quit the sport (although you may hear that from your significant others).  It means it is time to sit down, reflect, study, and learn (and heal).

So let’s take you through the steps.  You should never plan on crashing.  You should be aware that crashing is a possibility, but do not plan on it.  Do not go down the road of doubt.  You will not like the consequences.  I said crashing is not the end of the world, but crashing multiple times may be the end of your bank account.

There is a two second window in which you know you are going to crash.  Some people take the time to curse themselves, some people freeze, some prepare for the inevitable, and some try everything in their ability to escape their fate.  If you see an opportunity to ride it out, go for it.  Remember that rear brake in the dirt/grass.  The front brake will take you down immediately.  Get up on those pegs and rear brake only.  If there is nothing left, you ran out of road, or cannot think fast enough; prepare.  Relax.  Tightening up your body will do nothing for you but cause more injury.  How do drunk drivers survive horrendous car accidents?  Their body is totally relaxed and absorbs the impact, rather than fight it.  So relax.

Depending on the type of crash (lowside / highside), there are a few things to be aware of.  If you lowside and find yourself skipping along the pavement, please do not try and get up.  This will only cause you to tumble and you will hurt yourself even more.  Take some time (count to five slowly) after you believe you have come to a stop.  Touch the ground.  Is it still moving?  Then count to five again.  Make sure you have your senses after the dust has settled.  Many a rider has done the sideways moonwalk (no balance and dizzy) after getting up after a crash.  If you highside, good luck to you.  You are in someone else’s hands.  Think good thoughts and enjoy the view from up there.  I would shy away from sticking out limbs to break your fall, as they are easily broken.  It is up too you though.

Before you stand up, make sure you can wiggle your fingers, toes, move your legs, arms, and head.  Do this slowly and deliberately.  Make sure nothing major is broken before getting up.  Sit up, count to five, and then stand up.  Just to be safe.   Do not run to your bike.  There is no saving it.  You are not a pro, so leave it.  Find a nice shady spot (hopefully next to a kind corner-worker) and take a seat.  Your adrenaline will have taken over your body by this point.  You may feel like you need to run, jump, pick up your bike, help out someone in some way, but it is best just to sit down and relax.  The adrenaline may be masking the pain from an injury.  It is best to wait it out rather than irritate or worsen an injury.  If you can, get some water.  It will make you feel better and get that metallic taste out of your mouth (you will understand once you crash).

When the crash truck comes by, let them do the work.  That is their job.  They are there to do that.  Thank them of course, but just stay out of the way.

When you arrive back at the pits, get the bike on the stands and change out of your gear.  Drink some water and take some Advil/Tylenol/whatever.  You will need it no matter what.  Everyone will come and talk to you after a crash, just be ready to tell the same story about fifty times over and over.  After an hour has passed, it is time to evaluate what has just happened.

Get a pen and paper.  Draw the spot in which you crashed.  Try and remember every detail and document it on this paper.  Every detail from how fast you were going, what gear you were in, what makers you were using (turn-in, braking, etc.), body position, throttle position, suspension settings, tire pressure, type of crash, amount of braking pressure, etc.  Get every detail you can remember and write it down.  After all the information is down, become a detective.  The part about crashing that many people leave out is the “learning” part.  You must learn from your mistakes.  This is a sign of intelligence.

What could you have done differently?  What lead up to the crash?  Could it have been avoided?  What will you do next time?   How will you setup the bike differently?  Do you need to change or tweak some sort of your riding style?  You have to evaluate, learn, and change.  If you do not know, discuss it with a peer.  Everyone has crashed, so ask someone.  A second set of eyes will bring a refreshing perspective into the situation.  They may provide the missing link into the mystery of your crash.

Just remember:  DO NOT be embarrassed.  Everyone has done it.  Do not quit, learn.  Crashing may seem like a discouraging event, but you can turn it into a valuable experience.

 
Trackday Preparation PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jimmy Schrage   
Tuesday, 08 September 2009 15:52

Here are some helpful tips on preparing your bike (and yourself) for the next trackday:

1. Always try to have your bike prepped and ready to go at least two days in advance of the event. The earlier, the better. That way if you need something, you'll have time to get it. You have no idea how many “20 minute projects” turn into two day projects that require extra parts. Do not save the aftermarket part installs to the day before. It never works out.

2. Check your tires.  Check their overall condition; they shouldn't be "squared off", no dry rot, plugs, patches, or cuts.  If they are “blue” (from multiple heat cycles and the oils leaving the rubber) consider if they are track worthy or not.  Blued rubber does not mean throw the tires away, but more of a cautionary statement.  Check the pressure.  Most bikes work well on the track with 30-32 psi. front, and 28-30 psi. rear, cold. What you are looking for is a 4-6 psi. "grow" in pressure after you come of the track. If you get more than 6 psi., raise the pressure a pound or two. If you're getting less than that lower it. This all varies by tire and suspension as well.  Feel that back tires slipping out from under you? Drop a pound of pressure in the back and see how that feels.  Make sure you keep all your adjustments written down somewhere.  It is easy to forget. Get a good quality tire gauge, not a .99 cent one from Wal-Mart. A good $5.00 pencil gauge that has a 1-2% accuracy is fine. I don't like digital gauges. Some of the dial gauges are good. What you want is consistency, i.e. you want it to read the same pressure every time.  It may seem like a little overkill, but tires are one of the most important aspects of your bike, especially at the track.

3. Now it is time to check the brakes.  Check the pad wear; I like a maximum of 50% of pad wear.
After that the stopping power is significantly diminished. Get on your knees and (on almost every sport bike out there) you can view the pad with the tire still on.  Just look inside each of the front and back calipers.  Does it look a little thin compared to last time? Replace them.  Check your fluid. If it's dark or you've done a couple of track days, flush and bleed it. Go with any DOT 5 or above.  That fluid rating can handle quite the heat load and you will experience less fading as the day wears on.  The 2 main reasons for brake fade are; old fluid / worn pads.

4. Head to the back of the bike and check the chain and sprockets.  Check your chain for proper tension and for tight spots, look at the sprocket for wear on the teeth. As far as tension, I recommend 1-1/4" to 1-1/2" total up and down movement.  It should be able to hit the bottom of the swing arm of the bike.  This is so the chain does not stretch or impede the suspension when it is fully compressed or uncompressed.  If you have any doubt, sit on the bike and have a buddy check it. It should still have a little slack in it when it's fully loaded. While you're down there give it a good cleaning / lube.

5. Make sure your suspension is up to par.  For your forks and shock, make sure there are no leaks, set up sag / rebound / compression if you have those adjustments. If you're unfamiliar with making those adjustments, have a professional do them for you. Please be careful in this section.  Many crashes have happened due to “bench” racers giving bad advice on suspension settings. If you do not know, ask a pro and not the guy you are pitting with (unless his name is Nickey Hayden).

6. When was the last time you changed your engine oil and filter?  If you've got over 1500 or so miles, change them. Your motor will be spending a lot of time at high rpm; oil is cheap, motors aren't. While you're there, safety wire the plug and the filter. Although it's not required by most track day organizations, it's highly recommended.  Check your engine coolant level and top it off if necessary. Be careful not to overfill it though, antifreeze puking out of your reservoir bottle onto the track surface is guaranteed to make you lots of friends back in the paddock. You actually should not even be using antifreeze.  Invest in some Water Wetter and distilled water.  Flush that system and fill it using the recommended specifications.  That way if you do crash, the staff does not have to spend two hours soaking up one of the most slippery substances on the face of this earth.  Save everyone some time and sweat, change it out.   

7. You want your bike to run correct?  Fuel it up! Fill your tank and bring two 5 gallon cans too. You may not use it all but it's better than running out. Check in between sessions how much gas you have left in the tank.  There is not much worse than sitting in the hot sun watching your friends ride by while you sit in the dirt holding your bike up because you ran out of gas.  Someone does it at every track day.  Since you read this, it will not be you. 

8. Lights and turn signals have no place on the track. Remove or tape up your turn signals, tape up your taillight and headlight, remove the fuses or unplug the wiring, most bikes have a plug in the tailsection for the taillights. I use blue painter’s masking tape. You can get it at most auto parts stores or Sears Hardware / Home Depot. Please make sure that if you do not actually disconnect the lights that you cannot see the lights through the tape.  If you can, throw some duct tape over the painter’s tape. Remove your mirrors. Who cares who is behind you at the track.  That is not your responsibility.  You are required to look forward and have as much fun as possible.  After you take them off, you can fasten the upper back down with bolts and washers, zip ties, or mirror block off plates. Put the bolts and other parts back into the holes you got them from.  It is harder to lose them that way.  It's not required, but I recommend removing your license plate. It's one less sharp thing to bump into if you go down, and if it comes off, you'll be spared the experience of searching for it in the dirt.

9. This one always gets me. Chassis and fairing bolts. Grab a handful of Allen wrenches and sockets and check your bike to make sure everything is tight; there's nothing quite like going into turn one with your shifter dangling because the bolt backed out.  Been there, done that.  Searching for the magical lost bolt during a track day is not fun.  Neither is driving to the nearest auto parts store trying to explain the bolt to the salesperson.

10. Here are some general tips. Get to the track early, bring food, refreshments, Advil or something similar, chairs, EZ-Up, a fan, change of clothes, tools (if you have them), leathers, boots, back protector, gloves and helmet, extra shield and ear plugs. If you have any questions, or need some help, don't be afraid to ask, there are a lot of people who are more than willing to lend a hand. Enjoy the day, don't try to push too hard and it will actually come easier. Remember, no one ever won a track day. When you get home, untape your bike. The next day,(or as soon as you get a chance) wash it and check all your bolts and fasteners again, stuff tends to rattle loose after extended high rpm operation. Like I said in the beginning, this isn't the be all end all, just my system that has worked for me.

 
WSMC Race Report #2 - Jay PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 06 September 2009 21:17

This is Jay Fooey's second race report.  Great stuff! If you have not read the first, be sure to check it out!

This weekend I pitted with the usual WSMC novices Kris, David, Poncho, and Kris and David's friend, whose name escapes my mind at this time. Kris, Poncho and myself are pretty evenly matched as for lap times...

Going into this weekend, I set a goal for myself to run 1:30's and to get a podium finish...

Saturday practice was lots of fun, but for some reason I got stuck running consistent 1:33's - 1:32's. It was pissing me off, I wanted at least 1:31's since I ran that the month before in the NRS... But it wasn't happening not matter how hard I tried. In one of the late sessions of the day I was passed by 7 Ryan Gagliano, I watched him well, I saw the line he was taking through turn 8 and turn 9! The line through 8 is pretty much normal, but turn 9 he hangs way out there until about the 3rd cone, and dives in he has an almost straight drive at the apex going down the front straight. (it gives a great drive out of 9) I talked to James Morse (Cyclemall.net/CRS suspension tuner - CSTX instuctor) about where I felt I was loosing some time, and he gave me some tips on turns 5/6, I also talked to 7 Ryan Gagliano. He told me that I need to go FAST in turns 2 & 8, I talked to 391 Brian Kovarick (CSTX instructor) on my starts, I get ok starts usually 6th into turn 1, but shit I need to be a top 3 performer! But then you have to consider where I've been starting from as well... Practice starts were just that just practice, I'm not happy with them, but they will have to do for now... Fastest lap time of the day for me is: 1:32.643. I swap out my tires at the end of the day, because I didn't want to run into the problems I had last month, in not having time to do anything race day morning... Handled it!

2/17 race day...
I get there early and save a spot for the usual guys, Kris, David, their friend, and Poncho... I get the bike tech-ed, do the 2 morning practice sessions and hey I'm running 1:31's Woot!! I rub it in on Poncho... hehe, trying to psych him out! haha... and running the fastest lap time of our little group I was pretty jazzed!
The heavyweight novice race was the 2nd race of the day. I gridded 11th. On the start going into turn 1, I held the 6th spot... by looking at the recorded lap positions (mylaps.com), I held 6th for 2 laps. On the 2nd lap I was making a pass into turn 1, I completed the pass but came in too low, too fast, & late on the brakes. I tried to make the turn, but the bike was pushing out towards the edge of the track. I saw dirt and got nervous, I stood the bike up and went into off the track into the dirt (I didn't crash, just went dirt biking for the 2nd time) I lost 5 positions. I get back onto the track, (I was pretty lucky that I was so far ahead that all the other racers didn't pass me) time to get back in the groove and make up some ground. I pass 3 racers, now in 8th place, I've been trailing racer 616 for almost a lap. Trying my best, I show him a tire in turn 8. I decide to get a good run on him on the front straight by doing Ryan's line. I'm a ahead by a little, he just creeps up, we're neck and neck, I want to reach out as we cross the finish line, he beat me by .002 of a second!!!! I finish 8th out of 25 racers!!! I also have the 3rd fastest lap time of the race!!! the 2nd fastest time the guy finished in 10th place, I could have pretty welled podium-ed!!!!!

My fastest lap of the race: 1.30:080... Woot!! I'm almost in the 1:29 club!
3 out of 4 of the guys in our group did 1:30's! We finished 2nd (Poncho), 4th (Kris), 8th (Me), and 14th (David) great company leads to fast riders!
I don't like to look back on what could, would, should of happen in my turn 1 excursion, but I think I probably could have made the turn, but I chickened out when I saw the dirt, that's racing inexperience for you...
Well I accomplished 1 of the goals I set out to do, I have a new goal and a old goal for next month!

Thanks to my Sponsors: ~ Cal-Sportbike.com ~ Cal-Sportbike TrackXperience ~ KB Sportbike Services ~ Cyclemall.net ~ RAT (Rub and Tickle racing) ~ Countrywide Home Loans ~ BTP (Black Top Prayers)~ Cyclemall.net ~

Last Updated on Monday, 07 September 2009 18:56
 
WSMC Race Report #1 - Jay PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jimmy Schrage   
Sunday, 06 September 2009 21:13

This was submitted by Jay Fooey (WSMC Racer/TrackXperience Instructor/Great guy) via the For the win Racing forums.  This is a great read!

So about my 1st WSMC race...
My day was awesome to say the least. The day really didn't start off too well, as I wasn't prepared for it at all!!!! I got there a little early to stake my claim on a good pitting spot. The plan was to do my practice sessions and then change out my tires and then do my race at the end of the day, but late Saturday all that had changed when I found out my race was changed to the 1st race of the day! Like whole cow, I won't have time to change my tires out between practice and my race. I tryed to figure how I can get at least 1 practice in, and change my tires out... but time was wasting away having to regrister, going thru tech, having to get gas at the gas pump, because I forgot to get some, and just plain unloading all my stuff. I got behind and didn't make the 1st practice session, so I immediately start getting my tires changed out, I miss the second practice as well and just finish up with my tires just before the riders meeting. I have to say messing with my bike this weekend has had me beating the heck out of my hands, doesn't bother me too much as I am a mechanic, but man I have to take it easier ...lol

Race time!
I'm Gridded 12th, I'm starting to get the sequence down, on "2" I flip my visor down, "1" in gear, starting to rev, "1" side ways, I'm starting to Launch! front wheel comes up, I let off for a second and get back on it, wheel comes up a bit, I'm gradually giving it more gas and full throttle, I'm 5th or 6th going into turn 1... starting to pass on the outside of two made my pass, down shift going into 3 my back end is all over the place I pull in the clutch and it still was feeling loose. I stand the bike up and go dirt biking out in 3 but keep the bike up. I get back on the track in last (20th) place. I get back on it after feeling my tires are clean, I was back to business! On my last lap of the race I come up on 2 riders in turn 4 coming down to turn 5 they both park it, I don't know why they stop or close to stopping there, and I had to swing wide and clipped one of the those riders. I get on it hard and finished the race in 12th place!

I'm not happy with the morning and my turn 3 excursion, but I am very happy I finished my 1st race, I am happy with my 12th place finish after all that happened! Sure I have some things to work on and change, 1st no more medium tires for sure going with soft! I've got to either spend the night there at the track or get there earlier and get my stuff done, I want to change out my tires and do one session on them before race time. this was also the 1st time trying a 190 rear tire. Find out what Kris Johnson learned about launching?!?!?!?! A little birdie told me that Kris got schooled on Launching the day before!

Thanks goes out to a few veteran WSCM racers for their help, tips, opinions over the weekend!

Thad Wolff
Ryan Gagliano
Ken Kramer
Amy Hronek


a couple pictures from the weekend...
1st) coming over turn 6



2nd) got my novice racers license! Woohoo!!


Thanks to my Sponsors: ~ Cal-Sportbike.com ~ Cal-Sportbike TrackXperience ~ KB Sportbike Services ~ Cyclemall.net ~ RAT (Rub and Tickle racing) ~ Countrywide Home Loans ~ BTP (Black Top Prayers)~

Last Updated on Monday, 07 September 2009 18:56
 
Joe Rocket Ballistic Glove Review PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jimmy Schrage   
Saturday, 05 September 2009 04:04

REVIEW :: Joe Rocket Ballistic Summer Gloves

Reviewed by fellow rider/racer Brian

Name of Product: Joe Rocket Ballistic Gloves
Type of Product: Textile Gloves
Manufacturer: Joe Rocket
MSRP: $39.99

Manufacturer’s Description:

  • Rock Tex® 330 outer shell
  • 100% waterproof Dry Tech® mid-liner
  • Drum dyed leather knuckle
  • Shield wiper on thumb
  • Double leather wrap around palm
  • Reflective stripe



F.T.W. Racer Review:

Summer started in 05 and my motorcycle gear at the time consisted of mostly Joe Rocket Gear. The summer gloves blue/black and one of their perforated jackets to keep me cool in the intense summer heat of SoCal.

The pros of these gloves were nice while it lasted. The gloves did a marvelous job keeping my hands cool with the top layered in a thin material that allowed the wind to whisk away the sweat that would have otherwise gathered. The light weight of the gloves and thin material made it easy to fold up and stow away in the trunk of the bike.

The cons of the glove that make all the pros pointless. All the thin material used to keep the gloves light was the dark force that would ultimately make the glove rip on the palm area. Which had the Most padding on the glove.Ten stitches later. I will not go back to a Joe Rocket glove.

F.T.W. Racer Pictures (If Available): Very gory!  If you want to see them, please either email or private message me on the forums.

 

We do not recommend these gloves.

 

Last Updated on Sunday, 06 September 2009 21:42
 
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