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Streets of Willow Trackday PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 12 July 2010 17:59

7 - 10 - 10

Streets of Willow Trackday with TrackXperince!

Streets of Willow Trackday hosted by TrackXperience. First time using the GPpro so be kind :)

104 degrees. Hence the rapidly increasing lap times. Great day with great friends!

 
Plan for Chuckwalla Raceway PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Saturday, 17 October 2009 21:52

Chuckwalla Valley Raceway

The Chuckwalla Valley Raceway's plan to build a members-only, road course racing facility at the little-used Desert Center Airport got the go-ahead Thursday to move onto the next phase.

The green light came from the Riverside County designated director, Bob Lyman, as part of a public hearing at Lake Tamarisk Clubhouse.

“A 15-yearlong dream has been realized today,” said Micky Grana of La Quinta, who is part of a development team that includes Matt Johnson and Guy Evans.

The dawn-to-dusk raceway, proposed as a private, members-only automobile and motorcycle training and practice road course, would house parking garages, a clubhouse, timing and scoring towers, pit lanes, a 170-spot parking area, and a modular administration building at full build-out.

It is expected to attract 100 members initially, with membership capped at 600.

Initially, the county has authorized construction of one, 2.7-mile track and a paddock area. It also can house a Vacation RV Park — with no hookups — for up to 40 spaces.

The Chuckwalla Valley Associates LLC project now enters into a 10-day appeal period, after which the developers will begin to work through final conditions — including one more review of the final development agreement by the county — to obtain a grading permit.

“It's exciting,” said Jeanette Roberts, director of Eagle Mountain operations for Kaiser Ventures LLC. “This area has been stagnant for years. We've been waiting a long time for something like this to happen.”

Roberts called the project a creative breath of fresh air.

“It'll breathe life back into this community,” she said, nodding in the direction of a dust-blown corner along Interstate 10 that once brimmed with activity and now lays claim to a post office, cafe and service stations.

“Hopefully we will get a gas station one day,” she said. “Maybe even a bigger grocery store.”

“We've been without industry for so long, it's wonderful,” said Desert Center resident Mary Zeiler.

The Chuckwalla track is described as more low-key than the one proposed in Thermal, as the Thermal track would be built to Formula One standards and would be geared to drawing big-name races and hundreds of spectators.

“These are two entirely different facilities,” Johnson said.

Now that it has gotten to this step, Evans said the second leg of financing will be put in place to work through the entitlements and get the project up to date.

“We intend to build a first-class facility that will create 50 to 75 jobs immediately,” Grana said.

“I'm ecstatic,” said Evans, an off-road racer. “I think we've accomplished something that other people have tried to do, and failed for years. I look forward to getting this done.”

http://chuckwallavalleyraceway.net/

Last Updated on Saturday, 17 October 2009 21:58
 
Review :: Motion Pro Revolver Throttle Kit PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 14 October 2009 03:23

REVIEW :: Motion Pro Revolver Throttle Kit

The Motion Pro Revolver Throttle Kit is a variable rate, quick-turn throttle kit designed for use at the racetrack. The stock throttle tube has a pretty wide opening rate and is not adjustable, which can make getting it to full throttle difficult in some situations. Before, when I was coming onto a straight at the track, I had to either twist my wrist into an awkward, and sometimes painful, position to get to full throttle or roll off for a second to readjust my hand position. This costs time, especially at tracks that incorporate long straights or places that require full-throttle, so I wanted to try a quick-turn kit that would allow me to comfortably go to full throttle without having to adjust my hand position. This led me to the Revolver Throttle Kit from Motion Pro.

This installation is for ‘03-‘06 CBR600RRs. Other years or models may be a bit different.



What’s In the Box?

- Throttle Housing
- Cables
- Throttle Tube
- Four Variable Cams in 35mm, 40mm, 45mm, and 50mm sizes
- Motion Pro RoadControl Grips
- Start/Stop/Run Switch (Sold separately from the Revolver Kit)
- A Freaking Great Set of Directions

First Impressions:

The kit is fairly straight forward. There are four cams which you can use to adjust the rate that the throttle opens. The cams attach to a nylon throttle tube and they only fit on it one way, making it easy to put together without any guess work. The cam and cable housing is made of cast aluminum and seems pretty durable. From a ‘crashability’ standpoint, I was kind of disappointed that the cams and throttle tube are made from heavy-duty nylon instead of aluminum, but after thinking about it, I guess it would not make too much of a difference in a wreck. The nylon pieces are probably much cheaper to manufacture and replace and are pretty durable anyway, so it isn’t really a big deal. The stock throttle tube is also made from nylon.

Installation of the Throttle Assembly:

Installation of the throttle kit is pretty simple and is made even easier with the directions that come with the kit. If you can change throttle cables, you can install the Revolver Kit. Remove the tank cover and airbox to expose the throttle bodies. Before installing the new cables, make sure to lube them as they do not come lubed from the factory. Now, take off the old throttle cables and install the Motion Pro cables, making sure to orient them correctly for push/pull. If you mount them incorrectly the throttle will operate backwards. On this bike, the bottom cable end has two lock nuts, while the top has one adjuster and one nut, just like the stock cables.

To choose the cam you want, you’ll need to consider what kind of track you are riding on and what your personal preferences are. The bigger the size of the cam, the faster the throttle will open and the smaller the degree of twist will be. For example, if you are on a very technical track where you need more sensitive throttle control, use the 35mm or 40mm cams. If you are on a high speed track or a track with a long straight and need quicker throttle response, use the 45mm or 50mm cams. Do not start out with the largest cams, because throttle response will be quite different than you are used to, which could put you on your head pretty quick. Start with the smaller cams and then work your way up to the bigger ones one at a time. The cams are color-coded and clearly labeled for easy identification.



Instead of routing the cables around the front of the stock brake reservoir, the new cables will be routed behind and above the cover of the reservoir, so that the Motion Pro logo on the silicone boot faces upward. The assembly comes with a pointed set screw that is installed to help hold the throttle onto the bar, although the main allen screws make it pretty rigid. I tightened everything down, including the set screw so that it would make an impression on the handlebar. Then, I loosened the assembly and used a prick punch to put a divot in the bar so that the set screw had something more substantial to dig into. I then reinstalled the assembly and set screw onto the bar.



Next, install the grip onto the throttle tube. The tube has ridges on it to aid in holding the grip on, but I make sure to safety-wire the grips on anyway. A tip for installing grips – use an air compressor to spray some air between the grip and throttle sleeve, and then push the grip on the tube while there is a cushion of air in between both pieces. The throttle housing has a bevel that gives the grip a bit more clearance so that it does not drag on the assembly. After the grip is on and secure, adjust the slack in the throttle cables to your liking.



Installation of the Start/Stop/Run Switch:

Because the stock throttle housing on the ’03-06 bikes also contains the Start/Stop/Run Switch, you’ll need to install a separate kill switch on the bars. This is where it gets a little tricky, but as long as you follow the wiring diagram in your shop manual, you should be OK. If you get stuck, you can call Motion Pro for guidance on the installation, but I’ve drawn the diagram here for you already. You’ll need to drill a small hole in the bar to allow a holding pin on the new kill switch to mount firmly on the clip-on.

The new kill switch comes with bullet-style connectors to rewire the plug and wiring harness. The bullet connectors would work fine, but I also wanted to retain the ability to easily switch back to my stock throttle housing if I needed to. I went to Radio Shack and picked up three 9-pin connectors, two female and one male, for about $8 total. The female plugs would be installed on both the Motion Pro and stock kill switches, while the male connector is installed on the wiring harness. This way I’ll be able to quickly change back to the stock throttle assembly if I damage the Motion Pro unit. If you need to rewire anything, be sure to solder all of your connections. You don’t need any of these wires coming loose right before a race.

Connectors:


Here is a color-coded wiring diagram for each plug. The view is if you have unplugged the connectors and are looking into the front of the plug. Again, this is only for the ’03-06 CBR600RR, so if you’ve got another model bike, it might be different. The ‘07-09 600RRs come with kill switches separate from the throttle housing, so those do not require any rewiring. Notice that the Switch plugs and Harness plug are mirrored, so if you are using the bullet connectors, the top right switch pin will go with the top left harness pin, etc.



Harness:


Finished:


Thoughts:

- There are a few popular options for quick-turn kits out there, including HRC throttle tubes, R1/R6 throttle housing and tubes, and then the Yoyodyne and Revolver Throttle Kits. The HRC and R1/R6 tubes do not allow for any adjustability in the throttle rate, so I was not interested in going that route. That left the Yoyodyne kit and the Motion Pro Revolver Kit. The Motion Pro set is brand new and offers four variable cams as opposed to Yoyodyne’s three, so I went with the Revolver kit.

- The way that the cables are routed make the adjusters rub up against the brake reservoir cap. I was able to remedy this by bolting a silicone-covered brake line clamp on the clip-on mount and between the reservoir and cable adjuster, which pulls the adjuster away from the reservoir cap.

- The kit seems well built and very durable, so I’m very pleased with the quality. The cams are very easy to install in the housing and the installation was very straight forward. Like I said before, the kit comes with an awesome set of directions that make install a snap.

- I am starting with the 40mm cam to see what I like best. Just to see the variation, I put the 50mm cam on and compared it to the stock throttle on my ’06 600RR streetbike, and the difference in throttle rate is extremely noticeable. The Revolver Throttle Kit does exactly what I wanted for a pretty good price. It is a high quality product that I’m sure will be a necessity on all of my future track bikes.

Where Can You Get Yours?

Motion Pro products are circulated by pretty much every major distributor in the world, including Parts Unlimited, Tucker Rocky, and Lockhart Phillips. The Revolver Kit retails for $154.99 and the Start/Stop/Run Switch retails for $35.99. All individual components of the kit can be purchased separately for replacements or spares.

 
How To :: Clean a Chain PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jimmy Schrage   
Thursday, 08 October 2009 17:24

How To :: Clean a Chain

The purpose of this is to show cleaning and lubing of the chain. It is recommended that this be done every 500 miles. But if you ride in a particularly wet or dirty environment, you may need to do this more often.
Tools needed:

  • chain cleaner (this can come in various forms)
  • rag
  • brush (optional)
  • chain lube (this can come in various forms)
  • rear stand (optional)

In case you haven't noticed, chains will be one of the parts of your bike that will get very dirty. If uncleaned, that dirt will eventually penetrate your chain's o-rings and wear your chain prematurely.

Place the bike on a rear stand. If you do not have a rear stand, you'll have to clean and lube the chain in sections by rolling the bike forward or backward.
Clean the chain with the chain cleaner of your choice. Here are some popular chain cleaners:

  • kerosene - usually obtained at most paint or hardware stores
  • Simple Green
  • WD-40*
  • Motorex 411 Chain Cleaner
  • Motul Chain Clean

webBikeWorld did a comparison of kerosene, Motorex, and Motul (clicky-clicky).


* A note about WD-40: Many have used WD-40 and have had no problems. Personally, I do not recommend WD-40 because its an excellent solvent. Chains have lubricant trapped within the o-rings. The solvent properties of WD-40 penetrate o-rings and dissolve the lubricant in the o-rings. I've seen my o-rings fall apart fairly quickly using this product to clean my chain. In an extreme situation, WD-40 has been known to destroy bearings (clicky-clicky, source).
Apply the chain cleaner to the chain. Some chain cleaners will remove dirt with the spray application. Others will require dirt to be removed with a rag after spray application.



Some people also use some kind of brush to further remove dirt such as a toothbrush or a Grunge Brush. If you use a brush, do NOT use one with metal bristles as those will easily destroy your o-rings.
Its important to clean the chain because if you don't, chain lube will stick to the dirt on the chain rather than the chain itself. Not only will the chain not get the lubrication it needs but it will also easily fling off as the wheel rotates.


Now that your chain is clean, its now time to lube. There are many chain lubes on the market. Some popular ones are:

** A note about SAE-80/90 gear oil. This is the chain lube that is recommended in your owner's manual. This will work great but it applies onto the chain wet (as compared to the other examples listed above). This has two drawbacks, 1) it will fling easily and 2) it will be a magnet for dirt and dust.
[optional] At this point, some will ride the bike for a short distance to heat the chain. This allows the chain lube to stick to the chain easier.
Apply chain lube to your chain on the rollers that make contact with the sprockets.



You're done. Get out and ride.

Last Updated on Thursday, 08 October 2009 17:35
 
Avoiding Panic Braking or Swerving PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jimmy Schrage   
Tuesday, 06 October 2009 14:58

Motorcycle Safety Strategies for Avoiding Panic Braking or Swerving


By the time you recognize the danger, you have two seconds or less until impact. A motorcyclist, no matter how skilled, is more likely to stay upright if he learns how to avoid instead of how to react to dangers on the road. One of the authors of the famous Hurt Report—and a guy who has seen every sort of motorcycle crash concocted by man—offers 11 was to avoid getting into trouble.



When motorcyclists talk about safety and how to stay alive on the road, it's usually some variation on how to brake or—even worse—how to lay 'er down. The problem is that relying on emergency braking to get you out of trouble on your motorcycle is usually a really lousy strategy. Don't get me wrong—learning how to use your front and rear brakes effectively is a critical skill every rider should develop and practice. And when all else fails, there's no substitute for having a good DOT-qualified helmet on your head.

But relying on emergency braking or swerving to save your bacon is, I think, a dumb way to stay out of a crash. If a rider allows a situation to deteriorate to the point that he has to take emergency evasive action, he's probably toast.

Here's why: After detailed investigations of 900 motorcycle accidents in Los Angeles, the Hurt study (formally titled "Motorcycle Accident Cause Factors and Identification of Countermeasures") reported that the average time from the event that starts the collision sequence (such as a car beginning a turn across a motorcycle's path) to the actual impact was 1.9 seconds. A nearly identical research project just finished in Thailand reported the time at 2.0 seconds. In both studies, three-fourths of riders had less than 3.0 seconds between the start of the accident sequence and the crash. And keep in mind that riders don't always detect a problem the instant it begins. It may take anywhere from a quarter-second to a couple of seconds before something attracts the rider's attention.

Once the rider's attention is caught, reaction time begins. Most human-factors experts put average reaction time to traffic hazards at about 1.0 to 2.0 seconds, averaging around 1.5 seconds. If you swerve, add another half-second for the time delay due to countersteering and developing the correct lean angle before your motorcycle begins to head in the desired direction. Those delays leave little or no time for evasive action to succeed. About 30 percent of riders in the Hurt study took no evasive action at all, often because there was too little time. Even highly skilled braking usually won't do that much to delay your arrival at the crunch point.

Here's an example: Let's say you're going down the boulevard at the 35-mph speed limit when Joe Numbnuts turns left across your path. With reaction time and all, you've got one second left, so you do a highly skilled stoppie, bringing your speed down to 15 mph in that second. Your average speed during that one second was 25 mph, and you braked for 37 feet. If you hadn't braked at all, you would have covered that 37 feet in 0.72 seconds. So your highly skilled stoppie and nerves of steel delayed your arrival at the crunch point by about a quarter of a second compared to doing nothing at all. Is that enough time for Joe to clear his big SUV out of your way? Usually not. And few riders have as much as 37 feet in which to brake. Even worse, when faced with death or a world of pain seconds away, most riders do a miserable job of braking and swerving.

The Hurt Report found that riders with formal training (mostly California Highway Patrol and LAPD motorcycle officers, who had very demanding training and tons of time in the saddle) were no more likely to use the front brake than Melvin who learned to ride from his Uncle Clem. Or taught himself. Nor were trained riders less likely to slide out or highside when trying to avoid a crash. The point: No matter how good you think you are, don't count on overcoming the Pucker Factor when you're caught by surprise and think you're about to meet your Maker.

Instead of thinking you're going to save yourself with your lightning-fast reflexes and well-honed skills, you'll probably avoid a lot more trouble by working to prevent the situations where you have to rely on those skills.

1) Do all you can to make it easy for car drivers to see you. Probably 90 to 95 percent of car drivers who screw up say they never saw the motorcycle. Car drivers don't want to hit you. Honest. But some of them need extra help to know you're there. Do all you can to make it easier for them to see you. Use your high beam during the day. High beam is more conspicuous than low beam. Trading that cool-looking black leather jacket for something bright wouldn't hurt, either. (The only intentional crashes we ever saw in the Hurt study were marital disputes on wheels, with one spouse on the motorcycle and one in the car. You figure the rest.)

2) Freeways are good; surface streets are bad. Areas around shopping districts are the worst. Limited-access roadways such as freeways are good because car drivers can't turn across your right-of-way, so use freeways as much as you can.

3) In busy urban traffic, stay in the mix with the cars. Not out ahead of them; not behind. When you go through intersections where cross-traffic wants to use the pavement you own, stay right next to a car's front fender so you're not in the driver's blind spot and use the car as a shield. This is especially true at night because it's even harder for car drivers to distinguish a motorcycle from nearby traffic. Many riders who get picked off are the ones 30 yards ahead of a big clot of cars, or 20 yards behind.



4) Move away from potential hazards. If you're alone when you come up to an intersection where a car is waiting to cross your path, the more lateral distance you put between your path and the other guy's starting point the better. For example, if you're nearing an intersection where a car coming from the opposite direction can turn across your path, move to a lane closer to the curb. It'll make it easier for the car driver to see you, and give you more time to react, which is probably even more important than skilled braking.

5) Never assume the other guy has seen you. Keep your eye on a vehicle that's positioned where it could violate your right-of-way. When you've decided the other driver has seen you and you start looking farther down the road, that's the moment he'll choose to turn.

6) Take it easy when you're out carving canyons. As you approach a turn, pick out which rocks and trees look good to hit, because you don't want to hit the unfriendly ones (which, actually, are all of them). If you need a little extra time to run through this mental drill, let off the gas. And remember that if you hit a post-and-rail barrier, which is used to decorate the outside of a lot of curves, it will probably break every bone in your body.

7) No booze before riding. None. Ever. Your risk of causing your own crash skyrockets when you drink and ride. Riders with more than one beer in their systems are about 40 times as likely to crash as sober riders. And a drinker's favorite way to crash is by running off the road, which has a higher fatality rate than any motorcycle-car crash except head-ons because there are so many rigid fixed objects waiting to, uh, welcome you. Trees, fire hydrants, parked cars, culverts, the list goes on and on.

8) Split lanes on the freeway. It's safer than trusting the guy behind you not to rear-end you. In the Hurt study, more riders on the freeway got nailed from behind while staying in their lane than riders who crashed while lane-splitting. But don't go too much faster than the traffic flow and be really careful when coming up to a car with an open space in the lane next to it, especially if the lane with the space is moving faster than the one with the car.

Last Updated on Thursday, 08 October 2009 17:29
 
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